Large pileus of Cumulus featured

As well as some shots of that violent blast that hit the CDO HS and the area around Concordia Ave.  One ALERT gauge reported 1.34 inches!  Nice.  The uprooting of trees wasn’t so nice, however.

Sutherland Heights whiffed again on rain, except for that little sprinkle just after 8 PM, sad to say.

4:37 PM. What a great looking pilues of Cumulus with a little pileus veil at the very tippy top.
4:37 PM. What a great looking pileus of Cumulus  congestus with a little pileus veil at the very tippy top.  This is heading toward being a Cumulonimbus calvus (remember, “calvus” means “bald”), the most ephemeral stage of Cumulonimbus.  This stage doesn’t last long since its when the cloud droplets are disappearing because of the rapid formation of high ice particle concentrations inside the turret.  Remember, ice and water don’t stay together long; water disappears, evaporates due to mixing of environment air around the turret, all that ice  sucking the life out of those poor droplets since water vapor molecules  love ice more than being inside a droplet when ice is around and they escape to the nearest ice particle, which then gets fatter and fatter, cannibalizing those droplets in a sense.

4:42 PM. The very same Cumulus congestus on its way to Cb calvus. A bird, or possibly an F-116 or Stealth Fighter flies by in the foreground. Cool!

4:52 PM. Jumbo Cumulus congestus has congealed into a complex of Cumulonimbus clouds, riding the north wind that was about to sweep into the Sutherland Heights later in the evening.
4:52 PM. Jumbo Cumulus congestus has congealed into a complex of Cumulonimbus clouds, riding the north wind that was about to sweep into the Sutherland Heights later in the evening.
6:32 PM. WIth the gush of north winds, Stratocumulus and Cumulus bases quickly covered the sky, some piling higher into Cumulonimbus clouds.
6:32 PM. WIth the gush of north winds, Stratocumulus and Cumulus bases quickly covered the sky, some piling higher into Cumulonimbus clouds.
7:08 PM. Northerly wind and associated line of Cumulus above it grow into Cumulonimbus clouds. Very pretty scene. But tops not doing much here, so big dump not likely without something changing, which did! The older wispy turret above the larger rain shaft is already sinking back. The new shaft is coming out of the youngest, firmest looking turret.
6:55 PM. Northerly wind and associated line of Cumulus above it grow into Cumulonimbus clouds. Very pretty scene. But tops not doing much here, so big dump not likely without something changing, which did! The older wispy turret above the larger rain shaft is already sinking back. The new shaft is coming out of the youngest, firmest looking turret.
6:55 PM. Zoomed view of the top of turret where the new rain shaft is coming out. That bubble on the right side is just starting to show its ice externally, though grauple (soft hail) and/or hail were already hidden inside it as evidenced by that new thin rain shaft.
6:55 PM. Zoomed view of the top of turret where the new rain shaft is coming out. That bubble on the right side is just starting to show its ice externally, though grauple (soft hail) and/or hail were already hidden inside it as evidenced by that new thin rain shaft. Notice the younger turret behind it is higher, and therefore colder, and must also be full of precip.  Watch out below!  It doesn’t show the “softness” as the droplets evaporate in the presence of ice likely because its still on its way up, and condensation onto drops is faster than removal of vapor by ice.  Watch out below, #2.
6:57 PM. In the meantime, the Catalinas reap a nice sunset shower.
6:57 PM. In the meantime, the Catalinas reap a nice sunset shower.
7:08 PM. That new turret is now unloading around Ina and Oracle. Very exciting and a pretty scene, too, with the glow of the sunset.
7:08 PM. That new turret is now unloading around Ina and Oracle. Very exciting and a pretty scene, too, with the glow of the sunset.  This storm was to go on for another hour.
7:23 PM. Slightly out of focus, but you can see one of the MANY strokes of lightning that accompanied this tremendous downpour.
7:23 PM. Slightly out of focus, but you can see one of the MANY strokes of lightning that accompanied this tremendous downpour.

AZ mod (from 5 PM data last evening) thinks we have a chance for an afternoon dump today, Thursday.

The End