Early thunder on the Lemmon; later, but earlier, scattered big dumps and another light show

First about the rainfall around Arizona yesterday….

Jack is happy.  Got 1.21 inches yesterday afternoon.  Nice!  No doubt some of our friends, fellow lowlanders, who can’t take Catalina-Sutherland Heights when the temperature rises above 82.5 F unlike you and me, experienced that cloud downspout that occurred at to Happy Jack Ranger Station in Pine, AZ, at almost 8,000 feet elevation.

For additional rainfall reports beyond those provided at “Happy Jack”, of course, we have to go to about 3 dozen other places because no one has managed to cull ALL of the rainfall reports we get into ONE daily list.  Well, maybe the NSA has them all…  Here are a few more links to rainfall data:

USGS ones, where Happy Jack lives

Pima County Alert gauges

Rainlog.org

CoCoRahs (not a milk flavoring-hahahaha; I just kind of thought of that as I was writing it; creativity is indeed strange, as am I)

NWS Regional and State summaries

Not to mention the many “school net” and TEEVEE station-established rainfall reporting stations, and those folks who monitor rainfall at home but don’t report it to the rest of us who want to know about it.  Maybe NSA can help out there, too.  Hahahahaha, sort of.  (BTW, I have nothing to hide to whomever is reading this; well, mostly nothing.)

——-EDITORIAL OUTBURST——

How strange it is that we cannot go to ONE friggin’ site and get all of the rain reports for the whole State!  Would it be due to a lack of…….inter agency cooperation and competition, even among non-profit organizations???? (Insert creepy organ music here)

——-END OF EDITORIAL OUTBURST——

Back to rainfall observations…..

Douglas, AZ, if you haven’t heard from your favorite TEEVEE meteorologist who makes a lot of money1, has experienced its wettest June through August  ever, with 13 plus inches, with about two weeks to go!  This is for the purpose of generating a thought about a trip, a weather vacation, for you.   That whole area down there, with its historic heavy rains this summer MUST be seen!  Your weather diary will be sadly lacking without some notes about the vegetation, ponding and stream flows in that area.  Damn well know I’m going again.  There is a treasure of scenes, maybe new lifeforms, down thataway that won’t happen again in our lifetimes.  The specifics below from the NWS:

SXUS75 KTWC 130105
RERTWC
RECORD EVENT REPORT 
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TUCSON AZ
605 PM MST MON AUG 12 2013
...DOUGLAS ARIZONA RECORDS WETTEST METEOROLOGICAL SUMMER ON RECORD...
RAINFALL OVER THIS PAST WEEKEND AT BISBEE-DOUGLAS AIRPORT PUSHED 
THEIR 2013 METEOROLOGICAL SUMMER TOTAL TO 13.23"...WHICH ECLIPSED
THE OLD RECORD OF 13.07" FROM THE SUMMER OF 1964.
METEOROLOGICAL SUMMER IS THE PERIOD FROM JUNE 1 TO AUGUST 31ST.
THE 13.23" IS ALSO THE TOTAL FOR THE 2013 MONSOON. THIS RANKS AS 2ND 
WETTEST MONSOON ON RECORD...STILL WELL BEHIND THE RECORD OF 15.90" 
FROM 1964.
LASTLY...THE 2013 CALENDAR TOTAL OF 14.10" CURRENTLY RANKS AS THE 
19TH WETTEST YEAR ON RECORD.
$$

On to clouds, yesterday’s:

As a CMJ, you should have noticed the harbinger of better things ahead for late yesterday afternoon and evening when we had “thunder on the Lemmon” beginning at 2 PM, about 4-5 hours earlier than the two prior days.  Earlier is better.

Also earlier were the first scruffs of Cumulus clouds forming over the Catalinas, in this case about 2 h ealier than prior days, another “earlier is better” scene for rain here in Catalina-SH.  Here are some scenes; hope you seen’em.  Oh, my, another outburst of creativity.

First, before Cumulus, these “strangers”:

8:11 AM.  Billow clouds, Cirrocumulus undulatus, if you want a tech name.
8:11 AM. Billow clouds, Cirrocumulus undulatus, if you want a tech name.  They weren’t around very long, just a few minutes, hope you scene’em.  Best seen as action figures  in the U of AZ time lapse film for yesterday.

SONY DSC

11:13 AM.  Cloud street streaming off the Lemmon is pretty advanced for this time.  Cloud bases, too, a bit lower than the day before.  Lower is better (for rain amounts).
11:13 AM. Cloud street streaming off the Lemmon is pretty advanced for this time. Cloud bases, too, a bit lower than the day before. Lower is better (for rain amounts).
1:43 PM.  First ice on top of Ms. Mt. Lemmon.  Can you see it?  Answer in next image. I'm trying to learn you up on these things.
1:43 PM. First ice on top of Ms. Mt. Lemmon.   Should be in your diary.  Can you see it? Answer in next image. I’m trying to learn you up on these things…dammitall.  Note lack of a rain shaft at this time
1:43 PM close up of glaciated turret showing above the cloud mass above Lemmon.  There's some writing on it.
1:43 PM close up of glaciated turret showing above the cloud mass above Lemmon. There’s some writing on it.  Thunder b

While this early TSTM fabove aded quickly, dropping only 0.28 inches on Mt. Lemmon, the “Dump of the Day” (say, those within 5 miles of here) erupted suddenly just after 5 PM over and to the south of the Golder Ranch development at the foot of the Catalina Mountains.  The cloud-to-ground strikes came within seconds, not minutes from this dynamo, though like its predecessor, it did not last long.  Still, parts of it moved far enough north to give SH (Sutherland Heights) 0.12 inches.    Here it is:

5:16 PM.  "Dump of the Day", looking toward the Golder Ranch development from the parking lot at the top of Golder Ranch Drive. LTG was too scary to leave car.
5:16 PM. “Dump of the Day”, looking toward the Golder Ranch development from the parking lot at the top of Golder Ranch Drive.  LTG was too scary to leave car.

And, of course, the day finished out with another one of those dramatic sunsets, and the lighting on the clouds at  that time of day that makes us so happy to be here, that we can take temperatures above 82 F without having to depart for higher ground.  Last evening, this beauty:

7:03 PM.  Looking north beyond Saddlebrooke.
7:03 PM. Looking north beyond Saddlebrooke, and along with it, another fabulous evening of lightning.  Doesn’t happen like this as a rule in that colder, high terrain that our “temperature refugees” head for.  Much better down here for evening and nighttime LTG.

 

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1I dream about being a TEEVEE weatherman making a LOT of money.  I could then take those weather vacations I’ve dreamed of, never mind the State Department Travel warnings, to Cherrapunji, India, where they once measured over a thousand inches of rain over 12 months; to the Island of La Reunion in the southern Indian Ocean where tropical storms have sat and dropped, and your jaw will also drop, 72 inches of rain in ONE day, and 66 inches in 18 hours in a DIFFERENT storm–before that one let up.