Filling in the blanks

Breezy, deep blue skies were pocked with Cumulus humilis (“humble”) but as the afternoon wore on, they became more numerous, and spread out to nearly fill the morning’s clear sky, while remaining “humble”; about the same depth, 1,000 to 1,500 feet, max.  Cloud tops were above freezing, so no chance to form ice and snowflakes, which would have fallen out as virga.  Nor was there a single Ac lenticular, as opined here that there might be one yesterday.

These kinds of days with scattered clouds producing shadows on our spectacular Catalina Mountains is one of the most mesmerizing.  If you can, you want to be somewhere where outside where you can see those shadows trek across our mountains,  their rocky faces highlighted and then dimmed, while another portion lights up highlighting some other characteristic of those mountains, particularly in the late afternoon when the sun light is that bit richer (due to traveling through a greater path of the atmosphere as it sinks toward the horizon and more of the harsher, shorter wavelengths of white light are scattered out).  Ask any photographer or artist.

And its no wonder we draw so many visitors in the cooler half of the year when there are so many days like yesterday; no rain, pleasant temperatures, but astounding, simple beauty just in the passing of a cloud shadow on a mountain.

3:11 PM.
3:11 PM.
3:11 PM, looking farther toward the south.  So pretty.  You can just sit there and watch these ever changing scenes for hours
3:11 PM, looking farther toward the north. So pretty. You can just sit there and watch these ever changing scenes for hours.  “Less doing, more watching.”
5:15 PM.
5:15 PM.
5:33 PM.  Even our dreaded cholla cactus can have so much beauty in the right light.
5:33 PM. Even our dreaded cholla cactus can have so much beauty in the right light.
4:19 PM.  Wonder how many of you noticed this line of small Cumulus clouds, called a "cloud street"?  At first I thought it was caused by a bounce of the air going over and around Pusch Ridge, but later it was clear it had origins far to the south.
4:19 PM. Wonder how many of you noticed this line of small Cumulus clouds, called a “cloud street”? At first I thought it was caused by a bounce of the air going over and around Pusch Ridge, but later it was clear it had origins far to the south.
5:29 PM.  Still going, but you can see the origin is not much related to Pusch Ridge as it shifted westward and extended overhead and downstream into Pinal County.
5:29 PM. “Cloud street” still going, but you can see the origin is not much related to Pusch Ridge as it shifted westward and extended overhead and downstream into Pinal County.  The clouds were filling in pretty fast at this time, but barely deepening.
6:07 PM.  While the sunset itself wasn't spectacular, the lighting on the mountains was.
6:07 PM. While the sunset itself wasn’t spectacular, the lighting on the mountains was. Aren’t you glad you live in Catalina?

——————————————————

In spite of overcast Stratocumulus clouds right now in the pre-dawn hours, there are no echoes on the radar anywhere near us.  Boohoo.

 

And, if you’ve read this blog, and studied its contents, taken all the quizes, you know its because the tops aren’t cold enough to form ice (generally requires -10 C, 14 F here), pretty much required for rain here in old Arizony. Of course, some of our citizens are older than “old Arizony” as a State, which is pretty darn amazing, so maybe it should be, “not-that-old-Arizony”, to depart from whatever it was I was going to say before thinking about “Arizony.”

Now, back to weather….   Looking at the satellite and radar from IPS MeteoStar, it would appear that there are enough clouds around that a sprinkle is possible before noon as an upper trough goes by today. The air will be getting colder aloft, and there appears to be a line of colder clouds in a band right now in western Arizona, maybe ones cold enough to do that. Measurable rain is a very remote possibility, however.

Another trough, very similar looking to this one today, with a blast of cooler air comes through on Friday, October 4th, but like this one, looks dry.  So, we have two pretty nice weekends in a row ahead of us as far as moderate temperatures go, and more great cloud shadows.

No rain for SE AZ in models for the next 15 days.  Dang.

The End.