Remains of Amanda (Cat 4 hurricane) to bring rain to Catalina…maybe

The tropical fetch coming to Catalina (shown here yesterday) is from the remains of now strong hurricane Amanda, unusually strong for May for that matter, a month in which tropical storms in the Mexican Pacific are pretty rare, let alone have a Category 4 hurricane down there.  Has sustained winds of 140 mph now, BTW.

When pointing out the tropical finches yesterday, was not aware that the low down there was, in fact, a hurricane.  (Maybe I shouldn’t point things like that out, causing the one reader to lose confidence…. Too late now.)  Check out this loop from the U of WA for the “pinhole” signature of strong hurricanes.  Really happy to report that rain is on the way as May closes out (29th-31st are best chances for rain here).

Reprising yesterday’s cloud day…

1) Your day began with sprinkles from a cloud deck based at around 12, 000 feet above ground level (remember, too, that you can skip the “added value”, incremental approach below by just going to your great U of AZ time lapse movie.  I thought it was really very pretty for yesterday):

5:32 AM.  RW--
5:32 AM. RW– (very light rainshowers) were falling from what could be called a Altocumulus opacus deck with scattered taller turrets embedded in it, ones that produced the sprinkles.

 

2) clearing from the north:

6:24 AM.  The shallow nature of most of the Ac deck is apparent as the backedge moves toward Catalina.
6:24 AM. The shallow nature of most of the Ac deck is apparent as the backedge moves toward Catalina.

3) once the clearing arrived, small Cumulus began developing on the Cat Mountains and “?”:

9:36 AM.  I have no idea.  Move along now to the next photo.
9:36 AM. I have no idea. Move along now to the next photo.

4) nice small Cumulus all around, sometimes filling in to make it seem like a Seattle day in spring, with patches of Cirrus on top:

10:16 AM.  Cumulus humilis and Cirrus.
10:16 AM. Cumulus humilis and fractus (those shreds) and that beautiful Cirrus seemingly spreading its icy arms out (spreading likely due to perspective).

5)  Was there artwork in the sky?  You bet.  A niche developed here I immodestly remind you,  is that of cloud bottom photography, something I enjoy, and I think you do, too.  Below is one of the best ones of the day from the Cloud Bottoms Collection:

10:16 AM.  Cloud bottom of Cumulus humilis, maybe mediocris even, that was over ME.
10:16 AM. Bottom of Cumulus humilis, maybe mediocris even, that was over ME.  You look up, wondering, how deep is it?  Will it form ice and rain on ME?    Maybe graupel will fall out….since those are the first particles out the bottom of a growing Cumulus that is transitioning to a Cumulonimbus…  So much to think about when a bottom is over you.  Yours for $1,800,  if you call now.

 

6)  Late morning fill in:

11:23 AM.  Cumulus and Stratocumulus dominated the sky for a time; looked threatening, but no frizzy ice seen around the edges, so as dark as they looked, no ice, no precip.
11:23 AM. Cumulus and Stratocumulus dominated the sky for a time; looked threatening, but no frizzy ice seen around the edges.  No ice;  no precip or virga.  Pretty, though, with those shadows and sun breaks on the Cat Mountains

7) Smoky sunset (not a western singer, though it would be a good name for one):

7:06 PM.
7:06 PM.  Drifted down from the north.  Likely hours old, judging by the striations in it (not well mixed out and homogeneous  as would be smoke that’s days old).  Could not find source in satellite imagery right off.  I see that some of that layer is still visible to the SW this morning.

 

The End.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5)

6) Wildfire smoke drifts down in a thin layer from the N to spoil our sunset.  Note the reddish orange sun, a good sign of smoke and smog particles, tiny ones (typically, if you really want to know, that are 0.01 to 0.1 microns in size) that eviscerate the shorter wavelengths of sunlight so that only the reddish ones get through.