Seattle comes to Catalina

Friends, arriving this afternoon from Seattle for a sunny and warm couple of vacation days, will find that Catalina weather today is exactly like the weather they left in Seattle; poor Tommy and Patty.

Clouds will fill in as the day goes on,  becoming pretty cloudy at times, especially in the afternoon hours.   They  will starting to ice up, too, and you know what that means;  they’ll produce virga and light showers in the area, with breezes and a high of only in the low 50s.

Be sure to record the first sighting of ice in clouds today.  Will be a nice test for you, and a great ob in your cloud diary.

Still expecting a pretty major storm next week.

Got 0.12 inches in the gauge last evening.

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In the meantime, meet members of the former Cloud and Aerosol Research Group at the University of Washington, Professor Peter V. Hobbs, director.

Tom, who arrives today from Seattle, was our group’s software engineer at the University of Washington.  He was kind of recluse we learned after he was hired.  Liked to have a lot of high vegetation around his desk in our lab where me and a grad student worked.  However, unlike a prior software engineer, who was also brilliant like Tom, Tom really never fell asleep at his desk that we know of.

Jungle Tom, our brilliant software engineer in the Cloud and Aerosol Research Group at the University of Washington.  I hope you can find him.
“Jungle Tom”, our brilliant software engineer in the Cloud and Aerosol Research Group at the University of Washington. I hope you can find him.

Our first software engineer was Doug, shown meditating below.He was great! Worked long hours that often took their toll in the daytime.

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But, not to demean “Doug” whatsoever, who truly WAS brilliant, and his software helped enormously to grease the wheel of our group’s aircraft data analyses, and who  also made a lot of money  when he joined the then fledgeling Microsoft in the early 1980s, took his job especially seriously,  He liked to let people know how seriously, and exactly how much he loved working with computers.  And he dressed to show it.

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Software engineer, “Doug” arriving at work one day.

Cloud and Aerosol Researcher, “Stan”, monitoring cloud particle data on a flight over the Washington coastal waters.

It was a fact, that as I got embedded into perhaps the best Atmospheric Science Department in the world, I also learned that science draws “unusual”,  maybe even quirky folk, and “meditating” while on the job, perhaps “awaking” with new, substantive realizations of relationships, or ways of presenting data, was pretty common, not just with Doug:

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Graduate student, Stan, monitoring flight data in a cold front over the Washington coastal waters.
Cloud and Aerosol Research Group flight engineer, the one responsible for seeing that the instruments were functioning properly, "Jack", in a meditation mode on a research flight.
Cloud and Aerosol Research Group flight engineer, “Jack, ”  responsible for seeing that the instruments were functioning properly..

But there were other quirky  characteristics that turned up, like “Germophobe John”, shown below, who actually shared my lab room for many years:

Germosphobe "John" at work.  After awhile, of course, you don't notice these quirks, although the rustling of plastic all the time was annoying when he working.
Germosphobe “John” at work. After awhile, of course, you don’t notice these quirks, although the rustling of plastic all the time was annoying when he working.
Aerosol expert "Dean" we'll call him, who worked down the hall was an asymmetric dresser, and took pride in that.
Aerosol expert “Dean” we’ll call him, who worked down the hall was an asymmetric dresser, and took great pride in that.  It was also a way that he got people to talk to him when they came over to point out that his clothes weren’t buttoned correctly.  Dean was a leader in the sartorial rebellion of the day.

Then there was that one guy who worked as part of the flight crew who specialized in looking like John Denver, and liked to come in to work in the morning and report that someone on the bus he rode thought he was John Denver.  Seemed to get a lot of satisfaction out of that,  which in retrospect is kind of sad when you think about it.

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One of the CARG team members who took pride in being mistaken for John Denver. We in our Group remember how sad he was when John Denver died in a home-built plane crash.

Me?  I was pretty normal, really not too much affected by the various quirky people around me.  From those halcyon days, a selfie:

The author, Arthur, in the early 1980s.   I suppose the double pair of glasses was somewhat unusual, but other than that, I was fine.
The author, Arthur, in the early 1980s. I suppose the double pair of glasses was somewhat unusual, but other than that, I was fine. I suppose I was mad about some stuff in the domain of cloud seeding, maybe a little of that showing here.

There was some thought, however, that any quirkiness that was exhibited in our personnel might have been due to the various cancer-causing chemicals we worked with, one of which was Formvar, used to capture images of ice crystals that would hit the liquid Formvar on movie film rotating in the arm of a probe that stuck out of a pod,  or a glass slide that stuck out a hole on a stick in the plane.  In both cases, the crystal would hit the liquid Formvar, which would dry VERY fast, and then the impression of the crystal would be left in the plastic Formvar.

Below, “Diana”, and “Brad”, a brilliant grad student,  at least before he started working with Formvar, examine a jar of the smelly stuff.

"Diana" and "Brad" examine a jar of Formvar.
“Diana” and “Brad” , flight crew members, examine a jars of Formvar and maybe trichloroethylene used in conjunction with collecting ice crystal images while in flight.

 Yesterday’s clouds

7:37 AM.  Hope you saw this anomaly.  The linearity suggests this line of mammatus was ice generated by an aircraft.
7:37 AM. Hope you saw this anomaly. The linearity suggests this line of mammatus was ice generated by an aircraft.

 

9:23 AM.  Altostratus with puffs of new cloud forming on the upstream edge.  What would those separate tufts be called.  I don't know for sure, maybe, Cirrus floccus or castellanus.
9:23 AM. Altostratus with puffs of new cloud forming on the upstream edge. What would those separate tufts be called. I don’t know for sure, maybe, Cirrus floccus or castellanus.  Sure looks like Cirrus uncinus before it turns gray toward the east.

 

11:06 AM.  Moisture below the level of the earlier cloud begins to arrive, showing up first as a lenticular cloud in the lee of the Catalinas.
11:06 AM. Moisture below the level of the earlier cloud begins to arrive, showing up first as a lenticular cloud in the lee of the Catalinas.

 

1:01 PM.  Before long, clouds at different levels began to appear.  Here, two layers of Altocumulus the main one above a lenticular one.
1:01 PM. Before long, clouds at different levels began to appear. Here, two layers of Altocumulus the main one above a lenticular one.

3:53 PM. This was about an hour before virga and falling snow began to obscure the tops of Samaniego Ridge and Mt. Ms. Lemmon. Here the streaks, crespuscular rays, are NOT caused by precip, but rather dust

Some additional scenes from a 4 h yesterday into the Sam Ridge foothills:

Stuck here, might reached a limit, can’t seem to add photos, and there are too many already.

The End