The CDO roars after our 1.42 inches of rain

A few more hundredths fell after 7 AM yesterday, boosting our storm total to a remarkable 1.42 inches, January now about twice our long-term average.

Here’s what all that precip did to our beloved Cañada del Oro Wash:

3:53 PM. The CDO in full flow.
3:53 PM. The CDO in full flow at East Wilds Road, road closed.

Yesterday’s clouds

8:04 AM. A Stratocumulus overcast with areas of virga and light rain showers began the day.
8:04 AM. A Stratocumulus overcast with areas of virga and light rain showers began the day.

After a few more hundredths of rain, the skies broke open, and as we know well, some of our most spectacular scenes occur under deep blue skies punctuated by puffy Cumulus clouds, shadows and highlights on our now snow-capped Catalina Mountains.

10:36 AM. Cumulus clouds race toward Catalina borne on brisk southwest winds.
10:36 AM. Cumulus clouds race toward Catalina borne on brisk west winds.  In looking at this scene you can feel them coming at you.
10:36 AM. Deeper clouds capable of producing ice and precip still lay to the SSW of us.
10:36 AM. Deeper clouds capable of producing ice and precip still lay to the SSW of us.
11:19 AM. Heavy Cumulus line the Catalinas, spewing ice farther downwind.
11:19 AM. Heavy Cumulus line the Catalinas, spewing ice farther downwind.  Glinting rocks highlight the scene.
1:38 PM. Coming at you. The south end of the Tortolita Mountains is a common formation point in westerly and northwesterly flows for cloud street development, a line of clouds that stays in the same place, but elements are replaced.
1:38 PM. Coming at you. The south end of the Tortolita Mountains is a common formation point in westerly and northwesterly flows for cloud street development, a line of clouds that stays in the same place, but elements are replaced.
1:38 PM. The end of this cloud street shows that its tops got high enough to form a little ice, seen by that veil like cloud coming out the downwind end.
1:38 PM. The end of this cloud street shows that its tops got high enough to form a little ice, seen by that veil like cloud coming out the downwind end.
2:57 PM. Samaniego Ridge and its new coating.
2:57 PM. Samaniego Ridge and its new coating.
3:06 PM. Cloud streets continuing to stream off the Tortolita Mountains, but are now half the depth they were 2 h ago. No ice will form now.
3:06 PM. Cloud streets continuing to stream off the Tortolita Mountains, but are now half the depth they were 2 h ago. No ice will form now.
3:48 PM. "Devil's Post Pile" to the left of Samaniego Peak catches a sun break.
3:48 PM. “Devil’s Post Pile” to the left of Samaniego Peak catches a sun break.
4:01 PM. Last of the Tort cloud streets, shallower yet (estimated depth, 1000 feet) is about to fade into oblivion, wherever that is.
4:01 PM. Last of the Tort cloud streets, shallower yet (estimated depth, 1000-1500 feet) is about to fade into oblivion, wherever that is.

In the meantime, more highlights on Sam Ridge:

4:50 PM.
4:50 PM.  So pretty!
4:50.  Drawing back a bit for perspective on the scene.
4:50. Drawing back a bit for perspective on the scene.

Finally, that incredible sunset afterglow on our mountains:

5:46 PM.  I hope we never take such sights as yesterday's for granted.
5:46 PM. I hope we never take such sights as yesterday’s for granted.

 

The End.

Oops, oh yeah, storm tomorrow, supposed to begin in mid-day to afternoon hours.  Looks like a third of an incher.  Also looks to be a bit colder than the last storm, may see a flake or two by Tuesday morning.