Morning smog attack

One branch of a seemingly bifurcated plume, spread north along the side of Samaniego Ridge.  The other branch appeared to moved out of Tucson to Continental Ranch, “thence” northward toward the east side of the Tortolita Mountains.  It’s happened before, but is pretty rare, maybe once a year occurrence.

(Took an hour for these first three jpegs to be uploaded to WP, btw.)

7:23 AM.
7:25 AM.
7:25 AM.
8:16 AM. Smog plume at its maximum northward extend along Samaniego Ridge, Sutherland Heights area, before dissipating.
7:49 AM.
8:58 AM. Stratocumulus perlucidus races toward Catalina.
7:59 AM. Altocumulus translucidus perlucidus undulatus, quite a cloud-filled mouthful.
5:30 PM. This rain shaft is strong enough that one could suspect a weak Cumulonimbus cloud has erupted from the Stratocumulus.

Quitting here due to slower than dial-up service, hosting service, “godaddy” has confirmed its not them….

 

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3 thoughts on “Morning smog attack”

  1. Pretty smog free conditions here, Art. A morning temperature of 17F. Some pretty brisk winds from the NE yesterday. What’s the extreme lowest temperature you’ve seen there? Just asking…

  2. Yikes, 17°F. Don’t think I’d be biking to work today in SEA!

    Here in Catalina in February 2011, a remarkable cold wave hit. We reached a low between 15° and 16°F in gusty north winds. Citrus crops, lots of ornamental vegetation (e.g., queen palms) worth tens of millions were lost. The high that day was 36°F here under clear skies, but continued northerly winds. Never imagined such a day could occur here, the winds with the minimum temperature that morning making it so remarkable.

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    1. Thanks, Art. that February 2011 cold snap probably occurred late in the month, I’m assuming. Here I have an orange (or some kind of citrus tree) that’s been out side in a pot since autumn. Seems to be hanging on, but sometimes with plants you don’t see the damage until later.

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